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Plants In English Tudor Gardens

The intermingling of ornamental with useful plants continued to be common in Tudor gardens. As an innovation, Andrew Borde recommended that there be two divisions separated by a broad-hedged alley. One of these sections was to be devoted to pot-herbs, the other to "quarters and pulse together with a place for bee-hives." Sometimes, too, fruit trees were placed in a special enclosure. Generally, in the smaller gardens, all sorts of vegetation were included, and herbs grown for medicinal purposes ........ Read More

French And English Gardens Of The Middle Ages

The Roman de la Rose gives the best possible idea of both the French and English gardens of the Middle Ages. It was chiefly written by Guillaume de Loris, in the first half of the thirteenth century, and was probably well known in England before it was translated by Chaucer into English. There are several manuscript copies of it containing descriptions in the text, accompanied by illustrations giving vivid pictures of the pleasure garden. Its form—the walls enclosing it with their surrounding ........ Read More

Fishponds And Fountains In English Pleasure Gardens

As the cultivated ground of estates grew in size, it gradually came to be divided into compartments. These subdivisions were usually formed of latticework with square or diamond-shaped apertures, more or less ornamental as during the classic era. There were beds for plants raised several inches above the level of the path, retained by a stone coping, and fenced in with wattles, latticework, or open wooden railings. Fruit trees and herbs predominated, for as yet flowers were given no especial pro........ Read More

English Gardens During The Reign Of Edward I

The reign of Edward I allowed landowners to turn their attention to something other than defense and safety. As within the castle the wealthy lord sought to embellish the great hall, which often took the place of the ancient keep, with fine tapestry, richly carved furniture, magnificently carved garden statuary, large functional and ornate garden fountains, so outside as well he strove to decorate the gardens with fountains, arbors, and perhaps a maze. The improvement in husbandry and horticul........ Read More

Orchards In English Pleasure Gardens

The orchard in the Middle Ages was practically indistinguishable from the garden or pleasure garden. The orchard in those days contained, besides a variety of fruit trees, herbs for medicinal and culinary purposes and a few flowers, also fountains, seats, and the other architectural features of the pleasure garden. Many fruit trees are said to have been imported from France, especially in the thirteenth century, and hence were known by French names. Among the varieties of pears were the rule or........ Read More

Use Of Fountains And Statuary In English Monastic Gardens

Few exact records of English monastic gardens have been preserved. A twelfth-century plan of Canterbury, showing the cloisters containing a herbarium, garden fountain, and a conduit; with a garden pond, orchard, and vineyard outside the walls, gives only a rough idea of the planting and arrangement. But there is no other document even this complete belonging to this early period. Since, however, the various parts of all monasteries of the same order were as uniform as circumstances permitted, ........ Read More

English Gardens Of The 17th Century

English gardens had degenerated into meaningless repetitions of French and Dutch fashions by the end of the seventeenth century. Conventional plans were mimicked or exaggerated until the formal manner became merely an affected mannerism. Finally, nothing remaining but the defects of the old system, a reaction resulted in its entire destruction. On the ruins was created the Landscape Garden, in the strict meaning of the word no garden at all, but a stretch of cultivated scenery. The English — ........ Read More

Arbors In English Tudor Gardens

Every Tudor garden contained one or more arbors. One type had a square-topped roof, while the other type was arched. Both were constructed of willows or osiers. Fragrant rosemary, jasmine, and roses of various sorts, especially the sweetbrier or eglantine, were also trained over the trellis, which often rested on a part of the wall. As was remarked by an old writer, "the herb gardeners erected and framed most gardens in a refreshing manner" More solid constructions of brick or of stone were use........ Read More

English Tudor Gardens

The Tudor garden was a homely enclosure, like the living room in a simple house containing few, but good-sized, apartments. Sometimes one large enclosure answered many purposes. First of all, it contained the medicinal herbs. Then it answered the purpose of the pleasure garden, providing alleys and arbors for people to walk on and sit under, besides ground for games. Finally, it supplied a mixture of vegetables and flowers for use and ornament. The orchard, if not actually a part of the garden, ........ Read More

English Pleasure Gardens

Above all, the pleasure garden was intended for the diversion of the chatelaine. As early as 1250 we learn from a contemporary record that Henry III, to gratify Eleanor of Provence, ordered his bailiff at Woodstock "to make round about the garden of our Queen two walls good and high with fountains so that no one can enter, with a well-ordered herbary befitting her position, near our garden pond, where the said Queen may roam about freely." Here she might have meditated in solitude under a leafy ........ Read More

How The Medieval English Planned A Home And Gardens

Andrew Borde is the first writer who gave directions in English about how to plan a house and grounds. Much of his advice was practical, although often he saw fit to drag in a somewhat irrelevant quotation from the Bible, or a passage from some classic author to which we should not attach much importance. He was soon followed by Thomas Tusser with "A Hundredth Pointes of Good Husbandry," which has been interestingly edited under the auspices of the English Dialect Society. Hill's "Profitable Art........ Read More


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Forster Gardens Articles

Community Gardens Early Gardens City Gardens Vegetable Garden
Rock Garden Healthy Garden Rose Garden Tudor Garden
English Garden Botanical Garden Garden Design Summer Garden

Forster Gardens Books

Community Gardens Early Gardens City Gardens Vegetable Garden
Rock Garden Healthy Garden Rose Garden Tudor Garden
English Garden Botanical Garden Garden Design Summer Garden

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